Phippsburg, Maine is a small town along the Kennebunk River in the southern part of midcoast Maine. It is the site of Popham Colony, the first English attempt at settling New England. This was in 1607 and 1608. The settlement did not succeed because of the harsh winters. When the Puritans did end up settling New England, it was because of the help of Native Americans who welcomed trade and shared with them their belongings, food, supplies, and most importantly, taught them the skills necessary to survive on the land here.

Phippsburg, Maine is a small town along the Kennebunk River in the southern part of midcoast Maine. It is the site of Popham Colony, the first English attempt at settling New England. This was in 1607 and 1608. The settlement did not succeed because of the harsh winters. When the Puritans did end up settling New England, it was because of the help of Native Americans who welcomed trade and shared with them their belongings, food, supplies, and most importantly, taught them the skills necessary to survive on the land here.

 While visiting the Mashantucket Pequot Museum & Research Center, I met Clifford Sebastian, a member of the Pequot Tribe in Connecticut. He is the marketing and development associate for the Museum. Clifford recently returned from Standing Rock and when asked about his tribe's connection with the tribes in the Dakotas, he shared, “That is the one thing about the southeast woodlands, this area, everyone is pretty much unanimously in support of the protectors trying to keep this pipeline from being put in the ground. A good deal of that comes form the fact that we have our own smaller versions of that, we may be trying to resist some sort of pipeline, some sort of disastrous change to our ecology in the name of business.”

While visiting the Mashantucket Pequot Museum & Research Center, I met Clifford Sebastian, a member of the Pequot Tribe in Connecticut. He is the marketing and development associate for the Museum. Clifford recently returned from Standing Rock and when asked about his tribe's connection with the tribes in the Dakotas, he shared, “That is the one thing about the southeast woodlands, this area, everyone is pretty much unanimously in support of the protectors trying to keep this pipeline from being put in the ground. A good deal of that comes form the fact that we have our own smaller versions of that, we may be trying to resist some sort of pipeline, some sort of disastrous change to our ecology in the name of business.”

 Sunrise on Thanksgiving morning from the window of Foxwoods Resort Casino. Foxwoods is located in Ledyard, Connecticut on the Mashantucket Pequot Resort and Casino.  In 1983, President Reagan and the US Congress enacted the Mashantucket Pequot Indian Claims Settlement Act, granting the Pequot Tribe federal recognition and enabling them to repurchase land illegally taken from them in the centuries past.  As a business enterprise, they opened Foxwoods as a bingo hall in 1986. Over the years, they have expanded the casinos, hotel and shopping and have become part of a billion dollar industry.  Accrding to a Pequot Tribe member, this industry helps support reservation life and provides jobs to the local community. But remember, casinos are not their culture. It is a business.

Sunrise on Thanksgiving morning from the window of Foxwoods Resort Casino. Foxwoods is located in Ledyard, Connecticut on the Mashantucket Pequot Resort and Casino.

In 1983, President Reagan and the US Congress enacted the Mashantucket Pequot Indian Claims Settlement Act, granting the Pequot Tribe federal recognition and enabling them to repurchase land illegally taken from them in the centuries past.

As a business enterprise, they opened Foxwoods as a bingo hall in 1986. Over the years, they have expanded the casinos, hotel and shopping and have become part of a billion dollar industry.

Accrding to a Pequot Tribe member, this industry helps support reservation life and provides jobs to the local community. But remember, casinos are not their culture. It is a business.

 In 1620, settlers landed at Plymouth Rock in Massachusetts. This place is famous or infamous, depending on which culture is telling their history. What was the beginning for some, was the beginning of the end for others.

In 1620, settlers landed at Plymouth Rock in Massachusetts. This place is famous or infamous, depending on which culture is telling their history. What was the beginning for some, was the beginning of the end for others.

 Who will protect those who protect the water?  Sarah Rashad of Western Massachusetts holds her son, Espirito, during the National Day of Mourning. She is a member of the Cherokee Nation and her husband is Mexican.  This past Thanksgiving, hundreds gathered in Plymouth, Massachusetts for the 47th National Day of Mourning, organized by the United American Indians of New England. This year’s rally focused on protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and standing in solidarity with the water protectors in Standing Rock.

Who will protect those who protect the water?

Sarah Rashad of Western Massachusetts holds her son, Espirito, during the National Day of Mourning. She is a member of the Cherokee Nation and her husband is Mexican.

This past Thanksgiving, hundreds gathered in Plymouth, Massachusetts for the 47th National Day of Mourning, organized by the United American Indians of New England. This year’s rally focused on protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and standing in solidarity with the water protectors in Standing Rock.

 Who will protect those who protect the water?  Nature Boy, a man of many nations, attended the Day of Mourning. “Have you been to the Indian burial ground? Want to know where it is? You are standing on it.”   This past Thanksgiving, hundreds gathered in Plymouth, Massachusetts for the 47th National Day of Mourning, organized by the United American Indians of New England. This year’s rally focused on protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and standing in solidarity with the water protectors in Standing Rock.

Who will protect those who protect the water?

Nature Boy, a man of many nations, attended the Day of Mourning. “Have you been to the Indian burial ground? Want to know where it is? You are standing on it.” 

This past Thanksgiving, hundreds gathered in Plymouth, Massachusetts for the 47th National Day of Mourning, organized by the United American Indians of New England. This year’s rally focused on protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and standing in solidarity with the water protectors in Standing Rock.

 Harsh winters are common in New England and it was the help of Native Americans that enabled the settler's survival. They welcomed trade and shared with their new neighbors their belongings, food, supplies, and most importantly, taught them the skills necessary to survive on the land.  / Phot taken at a summer camp during winter in Western Massachusetts.

Harsh winters are common in New England and it was the help of Native Americans that enabled the settler's survival. They welcomed trade and shared with their new neighbors their belongings, food, supplies, and most importantly, taught them the skills necessary to survive on the land.  / Phot taken at a summer camp during winter in Western Massachusetts.

 Natick, Massachusetts is recognized as a former Praying Town. In the mid-1600s, Praying Towns were developed by the Puritans in New England. The purpose of these towns was to segregate certain Indian populations and convert local Native Americans to Christianity. John Elliot is one of the most notable preachers. In 1651, he settled Natick, Massachusetts with funds from England. He preached to the local Massachusetts Indians and with them, translated America’s first written bible into the Algonquin language.

Natick, Massachusetts is recognized as a former Praying Town. In the mid-1600s, Praying Towns were developed by the Puritans in New England. The purpose of these towns was to segregate certain Indian populations and convert local Native Americans to Christianity. John Elliot is one of the most notable preachers. In 1651, he settled Natick, Massachusetts with funds from England. He preached to the local Massachusetts Indians and with them, translated America’s first written bible into the Algonquin language.

 In the winter of 1676, Christian Native Americans were moved from ‘praying towns’ in Massachusetts to Deer Island, just outside of Boston. The island was used as an internment camp and as many as 500 tribal members died of exposure and starvation; they were left without food or blankets.   Now, the peninsula (no longer an island), is used for a water waste treatment plant. A stone at the beginning of a walking path reads, “The law secures to the people the right to a clean harbor.”

In the winter of 1676, Christian Native Americans were moved from ‘praying towns’ in Massachusetts to Deer Island, just outside of Boston. The island was used as an internment camp and as many as 500 tribal members died of exposure and starvation; they were left without food or blankets. 

Now, the peninsula (no longer an island), is used for a water waste treatment plant. A stone at the beginning of a walking path reads, “The law secures to the people the right to a clean harbor.”

 Who will protect those who protect the water?   Khari Nelson Moran, of Boston, is Wabanaki. He is on the search to learn more about his family; he recently learned they once resided in Maine.  This past Thanksgiving, hundreds gathered in Plymouth, Massachusetts for the 47th National Day of Mourning, organized by the United American Indians of New England. This year’s rally focused on protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and standing in solidarity with the water protectors in Standing Rock.

Who will protect those who protect the water?


Khari Nelson Moran, of Boston, is Wabanaki. He is on the search to learn more about his family; he recently learned they once resided in Maine.

This past Thanksgiving, hundreds gathered in Plymouth, Massachusetts for the 47th National Day of Mourning, organized by the United American Indians of New England. This year’s rally focused on protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and standing in solidarity with the water protectors in Standing Rock.

 Alexandra Blenis grew up in Boston. Her cultural identity exists to groups across all continents including Native American. Her mother is a mix of Cherokee, Semiole, and Cree along with Irish, Welsh, Scottish, French, German, and African. Her father is Japanese, German and Flemish.   She is a wellness teacher at a high school outside of Boston. “I always tell my students, please keep going to history class and ask questions about what actually happened because you are going to learn what you shouldn’t do. Learn from the mistakes of other people.”

Alexandra Blenis grew up in Boston. Her cultural identity exists to groups across all continents including Native American. Her mother is a mix of Cherokee, Semiole, and Cree along with Irish, Welsh, Scottish, French, German, and African. Her father is Japanese, German and Flemish. 

She is a wellness teacher at a high school outside of Boston. “I always tell my students, please keep going to history class and ask questions about what actually happened because you are going to learn what you shouldn’t do. Learn from the mistakes of other people.”

 Who will protect those who protect the water?  Idajovon Washington-Half Kenny comes from the Mi’kmaq Nation. She attended the Day of Mourning with her two sons.  This past Thanksgiving, hundreds gathered in Plymouth, Massachusetts for the 47th National Day of Mourning, organized by the United American Indians of New England. This year’s rally focused on protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and standing in solidarity with the water protectors in Standing Rock.

Who will protect those who protect the water?

Idajovon Washington-Half Kenny comes from the Mi’kmaq Nation. She attended the Day of Mourning with her two sons.

This past Thanksgiving, hundreds gathered in Plymouth, Massachusetts for the 47th National Day of Mourning, organized by the United American Indians of New England. This year’s rally focused on protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and standing in solidarity with the water protectors in Standing Rock.

 "Everything on earth has a purpse, every disease an herb to cure it, and every person a mission. This is the Indian Theory of Existence." - Mourning Done (Christine Quintasker) / Photo taken in Northport, Maine

"Everything on earth has a purpse, every disease an herb to cure it, and every person a mission. This is the Indian Theory of Existence." - Mourning Done (Christine Quintasker) / Photo taken in Northport, Maine

 Midcoast Maine was the home to many Native Americans from New England who survived through the 1700s. This is the land where they were displaced to and there are still some reservations further North near the Canadian border. This period of history, this group of people, and this landscape is rarely ever written about, proving that there is so much more we have to learn about native New England.

Midcoast Maine was the home to many Native Americans from New England who survived through the 1700s. This is the land where they were displaced to and there are still some reservations further North near the Canadian border. This period of history, this group of people, and this landscape is rarely ever written about, proving that there is so much more we have to learn about native New England.

 Phippsburg, Maine is a small town along the Kennebunk River in the southern part of midcoast Maine. It is the site of Popham Colony, the first English attempt at settling New England. This was in 1607 and 1608. The settlement did not succeed because of the harsh winters. When the Puritans did end up settling New England, it was because of the help of Native Americans who welcomed trade and shared with them their belongings, food, supplies, and most importantly, taught them the skills necessary to survive on the land here.
 While visiting the Mashantucket Pequot Museum & Research Center, I met Clifford Sebastian, a member of the Pequot Tribe in Connecticut. He is the marketing and development associate for the Museum. Clifford recently returned from Standing Rock and when asked about his tribe's connection with the tribes in the Dakotas, he shared, “That is the one thing about the southeast woodlands, this area, everyone is pretty much unanimously in support of the protectors trying to keep this pipeline from being put in the ground. A good deal of that comes form the fact that we have our own smaller versions of that, we may be trying to resist some sort of pipeline, some sort of disastrous change to our ecology in the name of business.”
 Sunrise on Thanksgiving morning from the window of Foxwoods Resort Casino. Foxwoods is located in Ledyard, Connecticut on the Mashantucket Pequot Resort and Casino.  In 1983, President Reagan and the US Congress enacted the Mashantucket Pequot Indian Claims Settlement Act, granting the Pequot Tribe federal recognition and enabling them to repurchase land illegally taken from them in the centuries past.  As a business enterprise, they opened Foxwoods as a bingo hall in 1986. Over the years, they have expanded the casinos, hotel and shopping and have become part of a billion dollar industry.  Accrding to a Pequot Tribe member, this industry helps support reservation life and provides jobs to the local community. But remember, casinos are not their culture. It is a business.
 In 1620, settlers landed at Plymouth Rock in Massachusetts. This place is famous or infamous, depending on which culture is telling their history. What was the beginning for some, was the beginning of the end for others.
 Who will protect those who protect the water?  Sarah Rashad of Western Massachusetts holds her son, Espirito, during the National Day of Mourning. She is a member of the Cherokee Nation and her husband is Mexican.  This past Thanksgiving, hundreds gathered in Plymouth, Massachusetts for the 47th National Day of Mourning, organized by the United American Indians of New England. This year’s rally focused on protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and standing in solidarity with the water protectors in Standing Rock.
 Who will protect those who protect the water?  Nature Boy, a man of many nations, attended the Day of Mourning. “Have you been to the Indian burial ground? Want to know where it is? You are standing on it.”   This past Thanksgiving, hundreds gathered in Plymouth, Massachusetts for the 47th National Day of Mourning, organized by the United American Indians of New England. This year’s rally focused on protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and standing in solidarity with the water protectors in Standing Rock.
 Harsh winters are common in New England and it was the help of Native Americans that enabled the settler's survival. They welcomed trade and shared with their new neighbors their belongings, food, supplies, and most importantly, taught them the skills necessary to survive on the land.  / Phot taken at a summer camp during winter in Western Massachusetts.
 Natick, Massachusetts is recognized as a former Praying Town. In the mid-1600s, Praying Towns were developed by the Puritans in New England. The purpose of these towns was to segregate certain Indian populations and convert local Native Americans to Christianity. John Elliot is one of the most notable preachers. In 1651, he settled Natick, Massachusetts with funds from England. He preached to the local Massachusetts Indians and with them, translated America’s first written bible into the Algonquin language.
 In the winter of 1676, Christian Native Americans were moved from ‘praying towns’ in Massachusetts to Deer Island, just outside of Boston. The island was used as an internment camp and as many as 500 tribal members died of exposure and starvation; they were left without food or blankets.   Now, the peninsula (no longer an island), is used for a water waste treatment plant. A stone at the beginning of a walking path reads, “The law secures to the people the right to a clean harbor.”
 Who will protect those who protect the water?   Khari Nelson Moran, of Boston, is Wabanaki. He is on the search to learn more about his family; he recently learned they once resided in Maine.  This past Thanksgiving, hundreds gathered in Plymouth, Massachusetts for the 47th National Day of Mourning, organized by the United American Indians of New England. This year’s rally focused on protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and standing in solidarity with the water protectors in Standing Rock.
 Alexandra Blenis grew up in Boston. Her cultural identity exists to groups across all continents including Native American. Her mother is a mix of Cherokee, Semiole, and Cree along with Irish, Welsh, Scottish, French, German, and African. Her father is Japanese, German and Flemish.   She is a wellness teacher at a high school outside of Boston. “I always tell my students, please keep going to history class and ask questions about what actually happened because you are going to learn what you shouldn’t do. Learn from the mistakes of other people.”
 Who will protect those who protect the water?  Idajovon Washington-Half Kenny comes from the Mi’kmaq Nation. She attended the Day of Mourning with her two sons.  This past Thanksgiving, hundreds gathered in Plymouth, Massachusetts for the 47th National Day of Mourning, organized by the United American Indians of New England. This year’s rally focused on protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and standing in solidarity with the water protectors in Standing Rock.
 "Everything on earth has a purpse, every disease an herb to cure it, and every person a mission. This is the Indian Theory of Existence." - Mourning Done (Christine Quintasker) / Photo taken in Northport, Maine
 Midcoast Maine was the home to many Native Americans from New England who survived through the 1700s. This is the land where they were displaced to and there are still some reservations further North near the Canadian border. This period of history, this group of people, and this landscape is rarely ever written about, proving that there is so much more we have to learn about native New England.

Phippsburg, Maine is a small town along the Kennebunk River in the southern part of midcoast Maine. It is the site of Popham Colony, the first English attempt at settling New England. This was in 1607 and 1608. The settlement did not succeed because of the harsh winters. When the Puritans did end up settling New England, it was because of the help of Native Americans who welcomed trade and shared with them their belongings, food, supplies, and most importantly, taught them the skills necessary to survive on the land here.

While visiting the Mashantucket Pequot Museum & Research Center, I met Clifford Sebastian, a member of the Pequot Tribe in Connecticut. He is the marketing and development associate for the Museum. Clifford recently returned from Standing Rock and when asked about his tribe's connection with the tribes in the Dakotas, he shared, “That is the one thing about the southeast woodlands, this area, everyone is pretty much unanimously in support of the protectors trying to keep this pipeline from being put in the ground. A good deal of that comes form the fact that we have our own smaller versions of that, we may be trying to resist some sort of pipeline, some sort of disastrous change to our ecology in the name of business.”

Sunrise on Thanksgiving morning from the window of Foxwoods Resort Casino. Foxwoods is located in Ledyard, Connecticut on the Mashantucket Pequot Resort and Casino.

In 1983, President Reagan and the US Congress enacted the Mashantucket Pequot Indian Claims Settlement Act, granting the Pequot Tribe federal recognition and enabling them to repurchase land illegally taken from them in the centuries past.

As a business enterprise, they opened Foxwoods as a bingo hall in 1986. Over the years, they have expanded the casinos, hotel and shopping and have become part of a billion dollar industry.

Accrding to a Pequot Tribe member, this industry helps support reservation life and provides jobs to the local community. But remember, casinos are not their culture. It is a business.

In 1620, settlers landed at Plymouth Rock in Massachusetts. This place is famous or infamous, depending on which culture is telling their history. What was the beginning for some, was the beginning of the end for others.

Who will protect those who protect the water?

Sarah Rashad of Western Massachusetts holds her son, Espirito, during the National Day of Mourning. She is a member of the Cherokee Nation and her husband is Mexican.

This past Thanksgiving, hundreds gathered in Plymouth, Massachusetts for the 47th National Day of Mourning, organized by the United American Indians of New England. This year’s rally focused on protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and standing in solidarity with the water protectors in Standing Rock.

Who will protect those who protect the water?

Nature Boy, a man of many nations, attended the Day of Mourning. “Have you been to the Indian burial ground? Want to know where it is? You are standing on it.” 

This past Thanksgiving, hundreds gathered in Plymouth, Massachusetts for the 47th National Day of Mourning, organized by the United American Indians of New England. This year’s rally focused on protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and standing in solidarity with the water protectors in Standing Rock.

Harsh winters are common in New England and it was the help of Native Americans that enabled the settler's survival. They welcomed trade and shared with their new neighbors their belongings, food, supplies, and most importantly, taught them the skills necessary to survive on the land.  / Phot taken at a summer camp during winter in Western Massachusetts.

Natick, Massachusetts is recognized as a former Praying Town. In the mid-1600s, Praying Towns were developed by the Puritans in New England. The purpose of these towns was to segregate certain Indian populations and convert local Native Americans to Christianity. John Elliot is one of the most notable preachers. In 1651, he settled Natick, Massachusetts with funds from England. He preached to the local Massachusetts Indians and with them, translated America’s first written bible into the Algonquin language.

In the winter of 1676, Christian Native Americans were moved from ‘praying towns’ in Massachusetts to Deer Island, just outside of Boston. The island was used as an internment camp and as many as 500 tribal members died of exposure and starvation; they were left without food or blankets. 

Now, the peninsula (no longer an island), is used for a water waste treatment plant. A stone at the beginning of a walking path reads, “The law secures to the people the right to a clean harbor.”

Who will protect those who protect the water?


Khari Nelson Moran, of Boston, is Wabanaki. He is on the search to learn more about his family; he recently learned they once resided in Maine.

This past Thanksgiving, hundreds gathered in Plymouth, Massachusetts for the 47th National Day of Mourning, organized by the United American Indians of New England. This year’s rally focused on protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and standing in solidarity with the water protectors in Standing Rock.

Alexandra Blenis grew up in Boston. Her cultural identity exists to groups across all continents including Native American. Her mother is a mix of Cherokee, Semiole, and Cree along with Irish, Welsh, Scottish, French, German, and African. Her father is Japanese, German and Flemish. 

She is a wellness teacher at a high school outside of Boston. “I always tell my students, please keep going to history class and ask questions about what actually happened because you are going to learn what you shouldn’t do. Learn from the mistakes of other people.”

Who will protect those who protect the water?

Idajovon Washington-Half Kenny comes from the Mi’kmaq Nation. She attended the Day of Mourning with her two sons.

This past Thanksgiving, hundreds gathered in Plymouth, Massachusetts for the 47th National Day of Mourning, organized by the United American Indians of New England. This year’s rally focused on protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline and standing in solidarity with the water protectors in Standing Rock.

"Everything on earth has a purpse, every disease an herb to cure it, and every person a mission. This is the Indian Theory of Existence." - Mourning Done (Christine Quintasker) / Photo taken in Northport, Maine

Midcoast Maine was the home to many Native Americans from New England who survived through the 1700s. This is the land where they were displaced to and there are still some reservations further North near the Canadian border. This period of history, this group of people, and this landscape is rarely ever written about, proving that there is so much more we have to learn about native New England.

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